SIDEBAR

Nature-Walk at Bajrabarahi Forest

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Jan 31 2015
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It was a wonderful Nature-Walk this morning to the Bajrabarahi Forest. I would like to thank all for making this event successful. The purpose of this Nature-Walk was to introduce this beautiful place both naturally and culturally reach and to help conserve the wildlife / Birds and flora of this forest. I would like to thank “Jyotidaya Sangh” the caretaker of this forest and Narayan Dai for the arrangements and support. Also like to thank Som G.C., Raju Acharya from Friends of Nature, Om Yadav from PhotoWalk Nepal and Ajay Deshar from Young Picasso, Ghanashyam Khadka from Kantipur and Bimal […]

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Revisiting Taudaha with FON

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Dec 25 2014

Taudaha Lake is a small lake in the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal. The name comes from a combination of Newari words ‘Ta’, meaning snake and ‘Daha’, meaning lake. Popular among bird lovers, this lake accommodates many species of birds. The lake, arguably the only clean water body remaining in the Kathmandu Valley, is a stop over for numerous migratory bird species. Some of the visitors to the lake include the cormorants, Ruddy Shelduck, Serpent eagle, common teal. Location: Taudaha, Chovar Camera: Nikon D600 Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR

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Taudaha Lake -Closest birding spot for Kathmanduities..

Dec 13 2014

The lake, arguably the only clean water body remaining in the Kathmandu Valley, is a stop over for numerous migratory bird species. Some of the visitors to the lake include the cormorants, Ruddy Shelduck, Serpent eagle, common teal. The Taudaha Lake is believed to be a remnant pool of the huge lake that once existed where now the city of Kathmandu sits. According to mythology, a Buddhist mythical character Manjushree cut the hill in the valley’s south, allowing the lake’s water to drain off, thereby creating land that was duly occupied by people. Folklore suggests that that “cut” in the […]

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World of Macro’s

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Nov 23 2014

When people think about extreme close-up photography, they often picture those lovely shots of butterflies, water drops or flowers. And while you can spend a lot of time out in the field photographing those types of subjects, there’s more to macro photography than meets the eye. When you begin to develop your own style and your unique view of the world, you soon find that no subject is off limits. Here are some macro photo’s from my last trip to Godavari Botanical Garden. Location: Godavari Botanical Garden, Nepal Camera: Nikon D600 Lens: Sigma 150mm f/2.8 EX DG APO HSM Macro Lens

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